The Deep, Hidden Powers of our Technology

How Technology shapes Faith and Culture

Flickering pixels are the tiny dots of light that make up the screens of life – from TVs to computers to cell phones. They are nearly invisible, but they change us, according to author Shane Hipps.

In his new book aptly titled, Flickering Pixels he takes readers beneath the surface of things to see how the technologies we use end up using us.

Not all is dire, however, as Hipps shows us that these hidden things have far less power to shape us when they aren’t hidden anymore. He adds, “we are only puppets of our technology if we remain asleep; Flickering Pixels will wake us up-and nothing will look the same again.”

As author, pastor and speaker, Hipps began his professional life in the corporate world as a strategic planner in advertising. It was here that he first gained experience in understanding media and culture and began to unravel the subtle secrets of electronic culture and the hidden ways it shapes culture, faith and the church.

Uncomfortable convincing consumers that a product or service could meet their spiritual and emotional needs, he up and left advertising for seminary school and quickly realized the many ways in which his previous training and knowledge translated to understanding the challenges facing the church.

As the follow-up to The Hidden Power of Electronic Culture (May 2006), which was written specifically for those in church leadership, this is not another heavy-drenched book on technology. Instead, Flickering Pixels explores the role of media and messaging in faith, community, worship and the future of the church.

Hipps believes few people truly understand the many hidden forces at work in our culture shaping our life of faith. He contends that everything from cell phones to blogs to television and radio are constantly barraging today’s minds with ideas that can subtly alter perceptions, ideas and belief systems.

Hipps argues that all media have a hidden bias with the power to subtly shape nearly every aspect of life. Using examples from today’s popular media, including Desperate Housewives, Saturday Night Live and many others, Flickering Pixels encourages readers to ask questions and carefully interpret media of all kinds with discerning minds and authentic hearts to best understand the implications today’s electronic culture has for faith, the gospel and the church.

About the Author:

Shane Hipps is pastor of Trinity Mennonite Church-a missional, urban, Anabaptist congregation. Before earning a Master of Divinity from Fuller Theological Seminary, he was a strategic planner in advertising where he gained expertise in understanding media and culture. Shane speaks nationally and lives with his wife, Andrea, in Phoenix, Arizona.

Learn more about Shane at http://www.shanehipps.com.

Thanks for stopping by Shane Hipps’s Flickering Pixels Sponsored Discussion.

Here are the blogs featuring discussions about Flickering Pixels.

A Peek at My Bookshelf
AKA Theodore Lewis
Bible Dude
Blog Tour Spot
Bound to His Heart
Callapidder Days
Captain’s Blog
Christian Bookworm Reviews
Christian SEO
Church Relevance
Fictionary
Good Word Editing
In a Mirror Dimly
it wasn’t me
J’s Spot
Just Thinking . . .
life outside my window
Lighthouse Academy
Man of Depravity
Matt Wiebe
Missio Dei
Monday Morning Insight
My Life Message
One Glory
Paper Bridges
Penning Prose
Pilgrimage of the Heart
Prayerfully Penned
Quiverfullfamily.com
Real Women Scrap
Refresh My Soul
Relevant Blog
Scraps and Snippets
Sumballo
This, That, and the Other Thing
Wildly Appropriate
Willohroots

Reblog this post [with Zemanta]
Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s