Start a tradition with THE GREATEST SHOW ON EARTH

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Many of us remember the magic of the circus from our own childhoods-one of the rare things that we can now pass down to our children as well. The circus has had such an influence on us as Moms, in fact, that in a recent Mom Central survey, 88% of Moms regard it as a “not to be missed” childhood experience.

Attending a Ringling Bros. and Barnum & Bailey Circus provides more than just a night out. It creates a memory that lasts a lifetime and a tradition that can be carried on from year to year and generation to generation.

One of my earliest memories of trips with my grandmother is going to the circus in downtown New Orleans. Since she didn’t drive, I have no idea how we even got there, but I remember the flutters I would feel in my stomach as we neared the doors to the then Municipal Auditorium. The cacophony of circus and children and clowns would swell with each step closer, and Grams endured my tugging to rush to our seats.

From the laughs that come at the clowns’ expense, the gasps of delight at seeing a motorcycle making its way across the high wire, and the huge grins that come from seeing elephants and tigers up close, the circus truly feels synonymous with childhood.

P.T. Barnum

There is no proof that Phineas Taylor Barnum ever said, “there’s a sucker born every minute.” He did, however, say that “every crowd has a silver lining,” and acknowledged that “the public is wiser than many imagine.”

In his 80 years, Barnum gave the wise public of the 19th century shameless hucksterism, peerless spectacle, and everything in between — enough entertainment to earn the title “master showman” a dozen times over. In choosing Barnum as one of the 100 most important people of the millennium, LIFE magazine dubbed him “the patron saint of promoters.”

While Barnum’s name will forever be connected with the great American circus, it is often said that his greatest success came in 1850, when he presented European opera star Jenny Lind to the American public. “The Swedish Nightingale” sang 95 concerts for Barnum.

Barnum was 60 years old when P.T. Barnum’s Grand Traveling Museum, Menagerie, Caravan, and Circus made its debut. At the time, it was the largest circus venture in American history. “We ought to have a big show,” Barnum said. “The public expects it, and will appreciate it.” Appreciate it they did: Barnum grossed $400,000 in his first year of operation.

By 1872, Barnum was already referring to his enterprise as “The Greatest Show On Earth” — and it was! “P.T. Barnum’s Traveling World’s Fair, Great Roman Hippodrome and Greatest Show On Earth” covered five acres and accommodated 10,000 seated patrons at a time … and, to reach more people, took to the rails.

In 1881, Barnum joined promotional forces with James A. Bailey and James L. Hutchinson. The result was “P.T. Barnum’s Greatest Show On Earth, And The Great London Circus, Sanger’s Royal British Menagerie and The Grand International Allied Shows United.” It soon became known as the “Barnum & London Circus.”

One of Barnum’s biggest successes — literally! — came in 1882 with his acquisition of Jumbo. Dubbed “The Towering Monarch of His Mighty Race, Whose Like the World Will Never See Again,” Jumbo arrived in New York on April 9, 1882, and attracted enormous crowds on his way to his name becoming a part of the language.

Barnum and Bailey went their separate ways in 1885, but rekindled their business relationship once again in 1888. That year, the “Barnum & Bailey Greatest Show On Earth” first toured America.

Several weeks before he died in his sleep, on April 7, 1891, Barnum read his own obituary: The New York Sun newspaper, responding to Barnum’s comment that the press says nice things about people after they die, ran his obituary on the front page with the headline, “Great And Only Barnum — He Wanted To Read His Obituary — Here It Is.”

Appropriately, it is reported that Barnum’s last words were about the show, which was appearing in New York’s Madison Square Garden at the time: “Ask Bailey what the box office was at the Garden last night.”

Following a funeral service that Barnum himself had planned and the singing of “Auld Lang Syne,” the great showman was laid to rest at Mountain Grove Cemetery in Bridgeport, Connecticut.

Please note that the code is valid for buying tickets with the following ticket price brackets: $24, $19, and $13.”

– The 20% discount code for Ringling Bros. Circus. Code: MCC
The code is valid for the circus shows in the following cities:

Grand Rapids, MI – Sept. 18-21, 2008
Denver, CO – Oct. 2-13, 2008
Boston, MA – Oct. 8-13, 2008
Cleveland, OH – Oct. 24 – Nov. 2
Chicago, IL – Nov. 6 – 30, 2008
St. Louis, MO – Nov. 6-9, 2008
Auburn Hills, MI – Nov. 12 – 16, 2008
Highland Heights, KY – Feb 27 – Mar. 1, 2009
Cincinnati, OH – Mar. 4 – 8, 2008

ement of the lights coming up, the performers riding in on elephants, the colorful clowns, and the acrobats flying through the air. Many of us remember the magic of the circus from our own childhoods-one of the rare things that we can now pass down to our children as well. The circus has had such an influence on us as Moms, in fact, that in a recent Mom Central survey, 88% of Moms regard it as a “not to be missed” childhood experience. Because we consider this family tradition so valuable, we at Mom Central want to share our newest blog tour with you.

Attending a Ringling Bros. and Barnum & Bailey Circus provides more than just a night out. It creates a memory that lasts a lifetime and a tradition that can be carried on from year to year and generation to generation. As one mom said, the circus is “worth every smile and mesmerized stare.” From the laughs that come at the clowns’ expense, the gasps of delight at seeing a motorcycle making its way across the high wire, and the huge grins that come from seeing elephants and tigers up close, the circus truly feels synonymous with childhood.
performers riding in on elephants, the colorful clowns, and the acrobats flying through the air. Many of us remember the magic of the circus from our own childhoods-one of the rare things that we can now pass down to our children as well. The circus has had such an influence on us as Moms, in fact, that in a recent Mom Central survey, 88% of Moms regard it as a “not to be missed” childhood experience. Because we consider this family tradition so valuable, we at Mom Central want to share our newest blog tour with you.
Nothing quite compares to the experience of the circus: the anticipation followed by the sheer excitement of the lights coming up, the performers riding in on elephants, the colorful clowns, and the acrobats flying through the air. Many of us remember the magic of the circus from our own childhoods-one of the rare things that we can now pass down to our children as well. The circus has had such an influence on us as Moms, in fact, that in a recent Mom Central survey, 88% of Moms regard it as a “not to be missed” childhood experience. Because we consider this family tradition so valuable, we at Mom Central want to share our newest blog tour with you.

Attending a Ringling Bros. and Barnum & Bailey Circus provides more than just a night out. It creates a memory that lasts a lifetime and a tradition that can be carried on from year to year and generation to generation. As one mom said, the circus is “worth every smile and mesmerized stare.” From the laughs that come at the clowns’ expense, the gasps of delight at seeing a motorcycle making its way across the high wire, and the huge grins that come from seeing elephants and tigers up close, the circus truly feels synonymous with childhood.

Attending a Ringling Bros. and Barnum & Bailey Circus provides more than just a night out. It creates a memory that lasts a lifetime and a tradition that can be carried on from year to year and generation to generation. As one mom said, the circus is “worth every smile and mesmerized stare.” From the laughs that come at the clowns’ expense, the gasps of delight at seeing a motorcycle making its way across the high wire, and the huge grins that come from seeing elephants and tigers up close, the circus truly feels synonymous with childhood.

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